“All Natural” Pet Foods

The following is excerpted from the “Canine Journal”:   (with some added notes from WPE in italics)

 

Dog owners want what is best for their pets and for many people that means feeding an all natural dog food. There are two varieties of all natural dog food: commercially produced and raw. Depending upon your budget and the time you have to devote to your dogs diet, one of these may better suit your needs than the other.

All Natural Dog Food is a Healthier Option

Just as humans thrive on diets without fillers and artificial ingredients, so too do dogs. All natural dog foods eliminate the additives and artificial ingredients that many manufacturers include to “improve the taste”, prolong the life of their products or simply add more inexpensive weight and bulk to the bag to justify the consumer price. On the other hand, all natural foods mimic the natural diet of wild canines and provide a more balanced approach to nutrition.

All Natural Dog Food Helps to Eliminate Allergies

For dog owners that must cope with canine allergies, all natural dog foods are a good option. Whether a dog suffers from skin or food allergies, all natural diets help to improve overall health and boost the dog’s immune system naturally. The majority of dogs that experience food allergies have trouble processing grains or specific protein sources, both of which are found commonly in mass market, non-natural dog foods.

All Natural Dog Foods Promote Better Digestion

Where many non-natural dog foods contain products that were never “designed” to be eaten by dogs, all natural foods contain only natural products that wild canines eat and process effectively. Many commercially produced dog foods contain a significant amount of fillers that can cause constipation and flatulence, as they create roadblocks to digestion.

Dogs Fed All Natural Foods Have Fewer Food Related Vet Visits

All natural dog foods are created with a balance of nutrition in mind rather than a maximization of profit. Nutritionally balanced foods result in fewer incidences of diabetes and joint concerns as well as a healthier weight because of the inclusion of daily required vitamin and mineral complexes in addition to more natural and regular digestion. Dogs who have experienced upset stomachs are often aided significantly by transitioning to an all natural dog food.

Checking Ingredients of All Natural Dog Foods

All natural dog foods will always be marked as such simply because it is a selling point for the companies that make them. Even if a dog food is labeled as “all natural”, it is still important to carefully check the ingredients of each food to look for potential allergens. High quality dog foods of all types will always list real protein sources in the top three ingredients. Real protein sources are not vague references such as “chicken meal” or “chicken by-products,” they should be listed as “chicken.” Healthy foods never include by-products or anything labeled as “meal” or “digest” because these are references to mystery meat products.

Understanding Nutritional Balance in All Natural Dog Foods

All dog foods claim to be nutritionally balanced with your dog in mind; however, not all nutritional balances are equal. It is important to research the nutritional needs of your dog based upon their special dietary needs (check with your vet) and their life stage in order to find a good food match. Some all natural foods have higher levels of protein than your dog may be used to, others may have higher carbohydrate or fat contents – these are all things to consider.

  • Protein:Pregnant dogs, lactating dogs, performance dogs, sled racing dogs and puppies all require higher levels of proteins than the average adult dog. Dogs battling illness also benefit from higher levels of protein, the exception to this is dogs with kidney disease. It should also be noted that puppies require a unique blend of nutrients that should be obtained through a specialty blend puppy formula.
  • Carbohydrates:Carbohydrates provide energy sources and fiber. While in the wild dogs diets contain less than 10% carbohydrates, commercial dog foods cannot be formed without the inclusion of carbohydrates. It is important to look for high quality carbohydrates rather than corn and wheat.    (ie., potato, tapioca, lentels, sweet potato, etc.) Since carbohydrates are not a significant part of a dog’s natural diet, there is no data concerning how much carbohydrates are beneficial.
  • Fat:Racing sled dogs and performance dogs have higher fat requirements from their foods than other dogs. Lactating or pregnant dogs and puppies also have slightly higher fat requirements than the average adult dog.

Good Protein Sources in Commercial All Natural Dog Foods

There is a wide variety of whole protein sources available for commercially produced dog foods, depending upon dogs unique needs one source may be a better choice than another. If a dog has experienced allergies to food products in the past it is generally better to go with a single source protein food.

  • Fish:Fish protein sources provide an array of natural oils and vitamins that help improve a dogs coat and joint mobility.
  • Bison: Bison is a very digestible protein source that is a good option for dogs that experience allergies to other protein sources.
  • Kangaroo: Kangaroo is an easily digested protein source and another good choice for dogs with allergies to certain protein sources. Kangaroo is an expensive protein source however making it cost prohibitive for many dog owners.
  • Beef: Beef is one of the more common protein sources for dog foods; however, it is also one that many dogs with allergies react to.
  • Chicken: Chicken is the most popular protein source but it is also the most common allergen as far as protein sources go.
  • Lamb: Lamb is a more commonly available protein source for dogs with chicken or beef allergies.
  • Venison: Venison is an easier to digest protein source recommended for dogs with allergies and it is less cost prohibitive than other options.
  • Duck: Duck is a common protein ingredient in “hypoallergenic” dog foods; it is easier to digest than chicken and is more affordable than other easily digested protein based foods.

Good Carbohydrate Sources in Commercial All Natural Dog Foods

Carbohydrates are another common source of allergies and while they are not necessary as a staple in a dog’s diet, they are necessary to create “kibble.” A dog’s tolerance to specific grain types will vary from individual to individual. All of the carbs listed below are gluten-free.

Grain Free Carbohydrates

  • Potatoes:Potatoes are commonly included in grain free foods as a carbohydrate source.
  • Sweet Potatoes:Sweet potatoes are an alternative carbohydrate source for grain free foods. This is a good carbohydrate option for dogs with sensitive stomachs.
  • Tapioca:Tapioca is an alternative carbohydrate that can be found in many grain free food options.
  • Peas:Peas are a non-grain carbohydrate and are commonly found in grain free foods.

Grain Carbohydrates

  • Barley:Barley is a substitute for corn or wheat and is considered to be a grain.
  • Oats:Oats are often used as a substitute for corn or wheat. Oats are considered a grain and will not be found in “grain free” foods.
  • Rice:Rice is a low gluten carbohydrate that is considered a grain. Dogs requiring a grain free diet will not thrive on this carbohydrate but dogs needing a low gluten diet may.

Good Fat and Oil Sources in Commercial All Natural Dog Foods

Fats and oils are a necessary part of all dogs’ diets; they help with brain development, bodily processes and skin and coat health. Just as with people, it is important to find high quality fat and oil sources that are not high in saturated fats and that provide as many fatty acids as possible. When looking at fats and oils in all natural dog foods there are a few things to look for:

  • Fats and oils should have a specific source such as: sunflower oil, flax oil, chicken fat and herring oil. Non-specific fat and oil sources should be avoided, these include: poultry fat, generic fish oil, animal fat and vegetable oil.
  • A minimum ration of 7:1 of Omega-6s to Omega-3s should be present or a fish oil supplement should be provided.
  • Mineral oil should be avoided.

What is Raw Feeding?

Raw feeding is another all natural approach to feeding your dog. Unlike commercially produced kibble, raw feeding centers on feeding dogs items that would be found in the wild. Raw feeding is also known as the BARF diet or Biologically Approved Raw Foods or Bones and Raw Foods; however, BARF is just one variety of raw feeding. The second type of raw feeding is known as the “prey model”. The principle of both of these types of diets is to feed uncooked meats, edible bones and organs.

BARF

The BARF diet is made up of 60 to 80% raw meaty bones and 20 to 40% fruits, vegetables, meat, eggs, offal (internal organs or entrails) or dairy food.  Raw meaty bones are bones that have 50% meat on them and include chicken back, wings and neck.

The Prey Model

The prey model diet is designed to replicate the natural feeding proportions that animals experience in the wild. This diet is comprised of whole prey animals such as chickens, turkeys, hens and rabbits. Around 80% of the prey model diet consists of meat, 10% bone and 10% organs (5% of this is liver.) Those who focus on this method of naturally feeding do not believe that dogs require vegetation or carbohydrates and as such they simply focus on feeding meat from a number of different “prey animals.” There are some people who feed the prey model that also supplement with vegetable matter to provide more vitamins and minerals. Additionally some feeders of the prey model add fish oil to food items to increase fatty acid intake.

The Importance of Balance in Raw Feeding

To many, raw feeding may seem as easy as throwing a few pieces of raw meat in a bowl and feeding; however, balance in raw feeding is very important. A significant portion of the balance in raw feeding comes from variation in protein sources. By switching protein sources not only do dogs receive varied nutrients from the meat but they also receive varied stomach contents which make up a portion of carbohydrate and vegetation intake. Many opponents to raw feeding believe that obtaining a balance in raw feeding is not possible and rely upon research to back up their claims.

 

At Wholesome Pet Essentials we have several options for you to consider with raw feeding.   Frozen complete, Freeze Dried complete,  Freeze dried premixes,  dehydrated foods, etc.   All will provide a complete nutritional profile for your pet!   

How to Choose the Best Large Breed Puppy Food and Lower Your Dog’s Risk of Hip Dysplasia

The following is from the Dog Food Advisor website:

http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/best-dog-foods/best-large-breed-puppy-food/

 

Choosing the best large breed puppy foods — and feeding them in the right amount — can significantly lower your dog’s risk of developing hip dysplasia during growth.1

That’s because the nutritional needs of large and giant breedpuppies are different from those of small and medium breeds.

And ignoring those needs can lead to crippling bone and joint disorders like:
Canine Hip Dysplasia Xray

  • Elbow dysplasia2
  • Osteochondrosis (OCD)
  • Canine hip dysplasia (CHD)
  • Developmental orthopedic disease (DOD)

However, before a dog owner can take steps to help prevent these conditions, it’s important to first understand the cause.

Why Large Breeds Are
at Greater Risk

Large breed puppies are those whose adult weight will ultimatelyexceed 50 pounds.3

When compared to smaller breeds, two important factors aboutthe way they grow make large breed puppies more prone to skeletal problems:

  1. They grow faster
  2. They remain puppies longer

A Labrador retriever can grow from just under a pound at birth to over 70 pounds in a year. That’s a whopping 70-fold increase in size in just 12 months.

In comparison, a human being can take 18 years to achieve results that are less than half that much.

What’s more, unlike smaller breeds that can be fed as adults at about 9-12 months, many larger breeds continue to grow and can still be considered puppies until 12 to 24 months.4

Rapid growth means the bones must change quickly — a factor that can put them at risk of forming improperly.

And it is this remarkable rate of growth that makes large and giant breeds so sensitive to nutritional imbalances.

The Protein Myth

Unfortunately, the Internet is awash with misinformation about how to feed large breed puppies.

For example, many insist that high levels of dietary protein can lead to hip dysplasia.

Yet contrary to that popular myth…

No evidence exists to link high protein intake to skeletal disease in large breed dogs.5

So, if high protein isn’t the problem — what is?

The Real Causes
of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

If you exclude all the less common factors, orthopedic disease in large breeds appears to be the result of at least one of 3 proven causes:

  • Genetics6
  • Overfeeding7
  • Excessive dietary calcium8

So, since after birth there’s nothing you can do to change your puppy’s genetics

It’s important to avoid overnutrition — feeding too many calories or too much calcium — to help lower your dog’s risk of hip dysplasia.

The Danger
of Overfeeding

Free choice is a popular feeding method in which the food remains in the bowl and continuously available — so a puppy can eat whenever it wants.

And many owners of large breed puppies mistakenly believe that this form of uncontrolled eating is the correct way to feed their pets.

However, free choice feeding has been shown to cause a puppy togrow too fast — and lead to serious problems.

For example, a 1995 German study of Great Danes demonstrated a significant increase in the risk of developing skeletal disease when the puppies were fed free choice.9

In another study, one group of Labrador Retriever puppies was fed throughout life a restricted calorie diet while a second was fed free choice.10

The restricted calorie group experienced a much lower incidenceand later onset of hip joint arthritis.

And Too Much Calcium

Like overfeeding, excessive dietary calcium has also been shown toincrease the risk of skeletal disease in large breed puppies.11

That’s because puppies can have trouble regulating how much calcium is absorbed from their intestinal tracts.12

And that’s not all.

Feeding too little calcium can also lead to problems.

That’s why it’s so important to feed a dog food that contains an amount of calcium believed to be safe for large breed puppies.

Recommended
Calcium Safety Guidelines

Unfortunately, although AAFCO13 has published nutrient profiles forpuppies in general

There are currently no AAFCO nutrient profiles designed to address the special needs of large breed puppies.

Yet fortunately, there’s general agreement among the experts that any food intended for large breed puppies should not only meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for growth, it should also contain:

  • 3500 to 4000 calories (kcal) per kilogram of food14
  • 3 grams of calcium per 1000 calories of food. That value should not exceed the safe upper limit of 4.5 grams15
  • A calcium-to-phosphorus ratio between 1.1:1 and 1.5:116

Although most AAFCO compliant puppy foods are suitable for small and medium breeds, only a few meet these special guidelines and can be considered safe for large breed puppies.

How to Check for
Safe Calcium Content

for the rest of this article and handy calculator tool please go to:

 

http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/best-dog-foods/best-large-breed-puppy-food/

Introducing Acana Regionals

Announcing the addition of Acana Regionals!

From Champion Pet Foods…..the makers of Orijen.  Made from Canada’s best and freshest ingredients, ACANA Regionals reflect our local heritage and express the diversity of fresh authentic foods produced from western Canada’s vast ranchlands, rich prairies, fertile valleys, and pristine waters.

Rich in protein, low in carbohydrates and entirely grain-free, these unique and flavorful ACANA recipes feature 60-70% meat and 35-40% of fruits and vegetables to nourish cats and dogs completely.

  • RANCHLANDS acana_ranchlandsBlack Angus beef, Alberta Bison, Alberta Lamb
  • For Adult dogs of all breeds and sizes and we have them in both small and large bag sizes!

More exciting news coming soon with new options for single source protein foods for your allergic pets!

Comparing Dog Food Labels

To follow-up on dog food labeling here is a label from a leading seller that many think is a great pet food.

GUARANTEED ANALYSIS

  • 25.0%    Crude Protein (min)
  • 10.0%     Crude Fat (min)
  • 4.0%      Crude Fiber (max)
  • 14.0%    Moisture (max)
  • 1.5%     Linoleic Acid (min)
  • 1.0%     Calcium (Ca) (min)
  • 0.2 mg/kg   Selenium (Se) (min)
  • 10,000 IU/kg   Vitamin A (min

And here is a label from another less known dog food:

GUARANTEED ANALYSIS

  • Crude Protein 24% MIN
  • Crude Fat 15% MIN
  • Crude Fiber 3.5% MAX
  • Moisture 10% MAX
  • Omega 3 Fatty Acids      0.5% MIN
  • Omega 6 Fatty Acids      2.6% MIN

Based on this guaranteed analysis they don’t look all that different do they?

 

But let’s take a look at the ingredient panel now…..

INGREDIENTS

Ground yellow corn, chicken by-product meal, corn gluten meal, whole wheat flour, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols, chicken, soy flour, rice flour, propylene glycol, sugar, tricalcium phosphate, salt, phosphoric acid, potassium chloride, animal digest, mono and dicalcium phosphate, dried carrots, sorbic acid (a preservative), dried tomatoes, avocado, calcium propionate (a preservative), L-Lysine monohydrochloride, choline chloride, Vitamin E supplement, zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, Yellow 5, manganese sulfate, niacin, Red 40, Vitamin A supplement, Blue 2, copper sulfate, Vitamin B-12 supplement, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, garlic oil, Yellow 6, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin D-3 supplement, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), calcium iodate, folic acid, biotin, sodium selenite.

Manufactured by: Nestlé Purina PetCare Company, St. Louis, MO 63164 USA

 

And the second one:

INGREDIENTS

Chicken, Chicken Meal, Pearled Barley, Oatmeal, Sweet Potatoes,Brown Rice, White Rice, Dried Whole Egg, Menhaden Fish Meal, Millet,Chicken Fat, Dried Tomato Pomace,Safflower Oil, Herring Meal, Cheese,Flaxseed, Carrots, Broccoli,Cauliflower, Apples, Green Beans,Chicken Cartilage, Potassium Chloride, Cranberries, Blueberries,Salt, Monocalcium Phosphate,Chicory Root Extract, Alfalfa Sprouts,Calcium Sulfate, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Sodium Selenite, Folic Acid,Taurine, Parsley, Sorbic Acid (Preservative), Vitamins, Minerals,Probiotics.

Fromm Family Foods LLC

 

Which one would you think is better for your dog?

The next time you go to pick up that bag of Beneful or other “grocery store/big box” brand please take a look at the label and think about it!

What’s All that Stuff in the Ingredient List?  

 

Here is a description of various ingredients that you might see in many pet foods.   This is from AAFCO…..   You may be surprised!

Meat is the clean flesh derived from slaughtered mammals and is limited to that part of the striate muscle which is skeletal or that part which is found in the tongue, in the diaphragm, in the heart or in the esophagus; It shall be suitable for animal food.

Meat Meal is the rendered product from mammal tissues, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices.  If the product bears a name descriptive of its kind, composition or origin it must correspond thereto., ie. Chicken meal, duck meal, lamb meal, etc.

And what you find in many other brands of pet foods carried by competitors:

Poultry By-Product Meal consists of the ground, rendered clean parts of the carcasses of slaughtered poultry such as necks, feet, undeveloped eggs and intestines, exclusive of feathers except in such amounts as might occur unavoidably in good processing practices

Corn distillers’ grains – the residual grains or byproduct that contain the nutrients remaining after the starch from corn has been fermented to alcohol.

Animal Digest – material which results from chemical and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of clean and undecomposed animal tissue. The animal tissues used shall be exclusive of hair, horns, teeth, hooves and feathers, except in such trace amounts as might occur unavoidably in good factory practice and shall be suitable for animal feed.

Brewer’s Rice – the dried extracted residue of rice resulting from the manufacture of wort (liquid portion of malted grain) or beer and may contain pulverized dried spent hops in an amount not to exceed 3 percent.

Corn Gluten Meal – the dried residue from corn after the removal of the larger part of the starch and germ, and the separation of the bran by the process employed in the wet milling manufacture of corn starch or syrup, or by enzymatic treatment of the endosperm.

Dried Animal Digest – dried material resulting from chemical and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of clean and undecomposed animal tissue. The animal tissue used shall be exclusive of hair, horns, teeth, hooves and feathers, except in such trace amounts as might occur unavoidably in good factory practice and shall be suitable for animal feed.

Poultry Digest – material which results from chemical and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of clean and undecomposed poultry tissue.

Quality Ingredients provide amino acids (Proteins) as needed! READ your label!

Our last discussion related to crude protein and the difference in quality of proteins that can both produce the same result on the crude protein level.     So the quality of those protein producing ingredients in the key.   We have to have appropriate levels of various amino acids (building blocks of proteins) in order to meet the needs of your dog or cat.   An essential amino acid MUST be supplied by the diet.   A non-essential amino acid can be synthesized by the animal assuming sufficient “build material” is available in the diet.   There are 10 essential amino acids for dogs and 11 for cats (they also need taurine).       Since levels of amino acids are not typically listed (not required)  on the label we focus on the quality of the ingredients used to make sure they are provided.    So let’s move on the ingredient panel and look at those ingredients companies use to provide protein/amino acids:

Quality ingredients:  whole meats…..   duck, turkey, chicken, salmon, lamb, whitefish, bison, beef, pork….basically any decent quality meat.   The one somewhat deceiving thing is that a meat may be listed first on the label but that is based on the water it contains also….once it’s incorporated in the diet it may not contribute nearly as much as it appears.

Typically we then move on to quality meat meals….  Chicken meal, lamb meal, duck meal, salmon meal, turkey meal, bison meal, pork meal, anchovy & sardine meal, whitefish meal, etc.    Note, that the terms used here do not include by-product in the name.     These are pure meat meals.    Excellent quality protein products.

The quality foods we carry end it here.

Many competitor labels however move on to various other by-products mostly as an attempt to cheapen the diet because they cost considerably less than high quality meat meals.   Various possible ingredients on the label might include:

Poultry by-product meal (and other species by-product meals, meat meal, meat and bone meal, chicken liver flavor, animal digest, beef and bone meal, pork and bone meal, chicken by-product meal, hydrolyzed meals (code word for acid treated feathers, etc.) etc.

Beyond that then we move into grains/grain by-products that are terrible sources of amino acids for your pets.   They include such things as:

Ground whole grain corn, corn gluten meal, soybean meal* , ground whole grain wheat, brewers rice, distillers grains, whole wheat flour, soy flour, wheat middlings just to name a few.

*Soybean meal is technically from an oilseed and not a grain.   It is commonly lumped into the same category, however, as there have been reported cases of gastrointestinal distress in some dogs fed soybean meal based foods.

This does not consider white or brown rice or pearled barley used as a carbohydrate to form a kibble.     Our foods do not use these as a major protein source.

Please, remember you are feeding for amino acids which require a high quality protein source on the ingredient panel.     Grab your bag of Iams, Science Diet, Purina, Kibbles n Bits, Pedigree, Eukanuba, Ol’Roy, Nutro, 4-Health, Beneful, Bil-Jac, Hills Prescription Diet, Newmans, PMI Nutrition, Royal Canin, Sportmix, etc and bring it in to compare to one of our brand labels.  You may be shocked.    Or view ours on-line.    And then you have the Blue Buffalo story where the people manufacturing their food under a contract for them was using the lesser ingredients and just not putting them on the label……

Tailwaggin Tailgate Party Saturday, September 19

We will be hosting a tailgate party for our furry friends and their owners on Saturday, September 19th. Lots of taste testing, great deals, games, face-painting, contests and give-a-ways.

Bring the entire family!

Wear your favorite team gear so you can pose for a picture with your furry friends in our photo booth!

It’ll be a great time, you won’t want to miss it!

at 11:00am2:00pm  CDT

So What’s In a Pet Food Label?

So what’s in a pet food label?

 

The Association of American Feed Control Officials stipulate 8 items that must be included on a pet food label.    There’s a lot of fine print regarding what has to go where on the bag and some of the terminology but in essence here are the 8:

 

  1. Brand and Product Name….pretty well self-explanatory
  2. Name of species for which the food is intended
  3. Quantity Statement….net weight or net volume
  4. Guaranteed Analysis…percentage of each of the nutrients in the food
    1. Requires minimum % crude protein, crude fat, maximum crude fiber and maximum moisture
    2. Other guarantees are voluntary or required if connected to a label claim
  5. Ingredient Statement
    1. Listed in order by weight on an “as formulated basis”
    2. Ingredient that makes up the highest percentage of the total weight is listed first
      1. That includes water before cooking….thus the “as formulated basis”
    3. Ingredients must be declared by the correct AAFCO defined name
  6. Nutritional Adequacy Statement
    1. Statement that indicates the food is complete and balanced for a particular life stage
  7. Feeding Directions
    1. At a minimum must state “feed (amount of product) per (weight) of dog or cat”
    2. Should include recommended feeding frequency
  8. Name and address of manufacturer or distributor
    1. If someone else makes the product must show that by using “manufactured for” or “distributed by”

It’s common practice to list the caloric content of the food within the area showing the feeding directions.   This is commonly listed as Kcals per cup.

Personal or commercial endorsements are permitted.    So keep in mind they probably mean very little.  Veterinarian recommended, veterinarian formulated and/or developed are easy criteria to meet.

 

From a practical standpoint we mostly focus on three key elements of the above requirements.   The guaranteed analysis, the ingredient statement and the feeding directions (including the caloric content).   It’s these three areas that provide us the most guidance as to the nutritional adequacy, appropriateness and quality of the food for your furry friend.   It does take some work to correctly interpret some of this, however.     While the first ingredient on the ingredient statement may be “duck” it may not be the ingredient providing the most protein in the diet….after the water is cooked out!   But it makes for positive marketing.     We’ll have more on that in future pieces.

Addition of Pork Chomps

We are please to announce the addition of Scott Pet Products Pork Chomps and related items.   Pork chomps are baked pork skin and are highly digestible.   Therefore they do not present the potential danger of an intestinal blockage like beef rawhides.     Dogs love them and the pork skin products do an excellent job cleaning teeth!  You won’t find any slimy rawhides laying around either sticking to your furniture or your carpet.      And they are economical!

From Scott:

The World’s Most Perfect Chew

Pork Chomps are more digestible than rawhide because they are made from skin not hide. Rawhide was just an inexpensive byproduct of the cattle industry, and virtually has no flavor on its own. That is why most rawhide is basted, stuffed or sugarcoated, in order to interest pets. Pork Chomps are also better than rawhide chews for dogs because of Scott Pet’s proprietary, patented expanding process wherein 70% of the pork’s fat is removed, creating a more natural dog chew that is a cleaner product with reduced grease and odor.

Pork Chomps are naturally delicious; that’s why dogs chose them 9 to 1 over ordinary rawhide in an independent taste test.

With a wide variety of shapes, flavors and sizes to choose from, there’s a perfect chew for every dog.

Specifically about Pork Chomps

Scott Pet has been in the pet industry for over 35 years. Our guiding principal has been to provide quality products that enhance a dog’s life. We maintain very strict guidelines in both our US based plants and our overseas plant. Pork Chomps are produced in China because it is the largest pork producing country in the world.

To ease your mind even further, Pork Chomps were a part of a two year study at the University of Illinois, a leading veterinary college. The study was to determine the digestibility of pork skin versus beef rawhide, (click here to view the study), it also reiterates the overall health and safety of our product.

And if you still have even the slightest doubt about feeding your dog Pork Chomps,  dog parents here at Scott Pet want you to know that we give our dogs Pork Chomps on a very regular basis.

 

So do the owners of Wholesome Pet Essentials.    

Meet Our Newest Pet Stylist!

Meet our newest pet stylist Andrea!

I discovered my passion for pet grooming in 2010 when I started bathing dogs that had boarded at a veterinary clinic that I was working part time for. From there I moved on to PetSmart as a professional bather then I went through their Grooming Academy in 2011. l have been grooming for 4 ½ years, and have loved every minute of it. I not only specialize in the typical all over haircut, but I am also trained in breed standard patterns and creative grooming. I have also been grooming cats for a little over 2 years. I absolutely enjoy helping pets look their absolute best, and see the smiles on their parents faces. I want grooming for any pet to be as fun and relaxing as possible. I am very excited to continue my grooming journey at Wholesome Pet Essentials!

Wholesome Pet Essentials's photo.
Many of you have already met Anabelle who has been styling pets for us for several weeks already!